Simulation

What are SOLIDWORKS Simulation Transient Sensors?

SOLIDWORKS Simulation Transient Sensors store transient data from thermal simulations, drop tests, non-linear simulations and dynamics simulation. Due to the nature of simulations which support transient data, this new sensor is supported in SOLIDWORKS Simulation Professional and above. The transient sensor replaces the existing response plots which were previously used. Loading of a transient sensor is much faster than response plots since the data is preloaded into the sensor. After your run the study, you can list and create graph plots of the data stored by the transient sensor.Create a transient study (nonlinear, dynamic, transient thermal, or drop test) In the FeatureManager design tree, right-click Sensors and select Add Sensor. In the PropertyManager: Under Sensor Type tracktype, select Simulation Data. Under Data Quantity, select the…

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The reaction moment on a fixed face [VIDEO]

Reaction moments are only applicable to element with nodes having degrees of freedom in rotation. This is not the case for solids as they only have 3 degrees of freedom per node (3 translations, but no rotation). So how can we get reaction moments on fixed faces of Solid Bodies?

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SOLIDWORKS Simulation Shell Elements Symmetry [VIDEO]

Have you ever tried imposing symmetry for shell elements in SOLIDWORKS Simulation 2012 or older? If you have then you would probably know it is a very tedious process and requires exact knowledge of what the symmetry condition actually does to impose it for shells….

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Offset Definition of Shell Elements [VIDEO]

When using Shell elements in your Simulation studies it is important to define the offset of your shell to ensure that the geometry accurately represents the 3D model. The default offset selection in a shell definition is Middle Surface.  Therefore the defined thickness will have half of the material on either side of the surface.  If you require all of the material on one side or the other, the Top or Bottom surface can be applied.  The direction is defined by the orientation of the mesh.  If the Top offset was selected, then the material will start from the Top surface of the mesh (part colour) and go below.  If the Bottom offset was selected, then the material will start from the Bottom surface of…

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Hole Series in SolidWorks Simulation [VIDEO]

Imagine a manhole cover in a pressure vessel that needs to be bolted to a flange in the pressure vessel. This usually requires a number of bolts to hold the two pieces together. Furthermore, same type of bolts may be present in the assembly at various locations. Imagine having to define all these bolt connectors for a simulation. I am sure this is going to give nightmares to people trying to simulate multiple bolts using SolidWorks Simulation. You will be happy to learn that SolidWorks Simulation has a smart feature which could reduce the effort in the definition of these bolt connectors.

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Which Solver? FFEPlus vs. Direct Sparse – PART 1

SolidWorks simulation provides two options to solve the set of FEA algebraic equations; iterative or direct solution methods. The iterative solver, FFEPlus, uses approximate techniques to solve the problem. It assumes a solution and then calculates the associated errors. The iterations continue until the errors become acceptable. The…

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Irfan’s SW 2013 Flow Simulation Pick of the Day: Flow Leakage Browser [VIDEO]

My SolidWorks Flow Simulation 2013 pick of the day is the new leakage browser functionality. Hidden within the lids creation tool is the leakage tracking functionality. It helps you quickly locate holes or displacement gaps within the flow models. The tool works by selecting a pair of faces, one on the inside of the flow domain and one on the outside of the flow domain and then finds a connecting path between the two faces. The only way to get from one face to the other would be through a hole or a gap. This tool can really help debug issues with flow domains which would have required a lot of manual effort in the previous releases. Watch the video below to see the tool in action.  

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Simulation: Shell Elements vs. Solid Elements

A number of people are quite reluctant to use shell elements vs. solid elements. Shell elements can be a huge time save since they allow the modelling of thin features with relatively much fewer elements than solid elements. They are also easier to mesh and…

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Fatigue? You mean my assembly is tired? (A Glossary of Terms used in FEA)

New to stress analysis? Ever wondering what they mean by yield or creep or fatigue when performing Simulation studies? Joe Galiera, SolidWorks Simulation Technical Manager, started a series of blog posts with the intention of discussing the meaning of 150 “good to know” analysis terms. Joe writes: I thought it might be a good idea to provide some basic definitions of terms that are used in analysis that are good to know, to be able to communicate intelligently about Simulation.  These are not meant to be definitive technical definitions but more fundamental knowledge of these terms You can find this glossary of analysis terms in the SolidWorks Simulation Blog. As of today there are 3 posts, covering the first 29 terms: Terms used in analysis – Set…

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