SOLIDWORKS Routing

SOLIDWORKS Routing Resources including technical tips and tutorials

SOLIDWORKS Routing Fixed Length Coverings

New to SOLIDWORKS 2019, is the ability to add Coverings of a Fixed Length. This works with routes that use splines, such as tube and electrical routes. To use this tool, edit a route and select a spline route segment. The Fixed Length Covering command, can be launched from the Tools menu in SOLIDWORKS, as shown below. The command can also be added to the appropriate Command Manager tab, by Customizing the Command Manager. The length of of the covering can be defined by a linear value, offset values or an offset and a linear value. Other then defining the length of the Fixed Length Covering, the remaining options remain the same as the standard Covering tool.

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Splice Up Your Life with SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2019

Route your complete design in 3D with SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2019!

Much like taxes, new Marvel movies, and broken fillets in SOLIDWORKS, inline connectors and splices are an eventuality for electrical harness designers. These types of connections are easy to set up in SOLIDWORKS Electrical Schematic, but were prone to errors when the design was sent for 3D routing. Being able to plan and calculate the 3D routes is often of enormous value to harness designers, but having to choose between gaining these benefits or using common connections was not an ideal scenario.  Fear not, Electrical design friends, SOLIDWORKS developers have answered our pleas with SOLIDWORKS Electrical 2019! From a schematic standpoint, 2019 retains similar inline connection functionality to the previous releases. Designers can define a simple symbol and component with a terminal passing circuit. This will ensure that Electrical Schematic recognizes that all wires connected to this symbol are part of the same equipotential, a valuable behavior when performing design…

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What are the SOLIDWORKS Routing Component Grouping BOM Properties?

SOLIDWORKS Routing Component Grouping BOM Properties are a number of options in the Bill of Materials Property Manager which are specific to SOLIDWORKS Routing: Show only routing Components in BOM: will exclude components that are not part of a route, from the BOM. Group pipes or tubes with same diameter and schedule: will combine tubes that match this criteria, into a single line item. Group spool components: will list Spools as separate entries in the BOM. If Spools are not Grouped, the Spool Reference will be displayed on the row, of the referenced component Display units: will add units to any column, that displays a measured value.

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How to add Slope to a SOLIDWORKS Routing BOM

SOLIDWORKS Routing Pipe Slope can be easily added to a Route and the information pertaining to the Pipe Slope can be displayed in the associated Route BOM. The first step is to define the Pipe Slope. This can be done by picking Add Slope from the Piping tab, of the Command Manager or from the right-mouse menu. Defining the Slope consists of identifying the Slope Segments, the Slope Direction, the Start Point for the Slope and the magnitude of Slope. In the Route BOM, after inserting a Column or Editing a Column, the Route Property Slope, can be associated with that column. Note: a Route Assembly must be saved as an external file before the BOM information can be extracted.

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How to add Spool References to a SOLIDWORKS Routing BOM

SOLIDWORKS Routing Spool References

SOLIDWORKS Routing Spool References are defined in a Route Assembly and can be referenced in the Route Assembly BOM. The first step is to Define a Spool. The Define Spools command is available from the SOLIDWORKS Command Manager Piping menu. Once defined, the Spool will be listed under the Route Assembly, in the SOLIDWORKS Feature Manager. By double-clicking a BOM column, the Route Property, Spool Reference, can be linked to that column. This will display all Spools, that are defined in the Route Assembly. By selecting Group Spool Components in the BOM properties, Spools can be displayed as separate items. NOTE: It is important to understand that a Spool is NOT a sub-assembly. A Spool is a reference shared between a selected number of components that are part of a Route Assembly

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How to route Pipes, Tubes, Wires, Cables, or Ducting in SOLIDWORKS

SOLIDWORKS Routing Add-in

Do your designs contain piping, tubing, wires, cables or even duct work? If so, you know that these contain many parts to create, assemble and then detail! SOLIDWORKS Premium software includes the SOLIDWORKS Routing add-in application. With the SOLIDWORKS Routing add-in you can create a special type of sub-assembly that builds a path of pipes, tubes, electrical cables or ducts between components at the assembly level automatically! A route sub-assembly is made up of three types of entities: Components, which are parts like fittings  connectors, including flanges, tees, electrical connectors, and clips. Route parts, which include pipes, tubes, wires, cables, and ducts. Route feature, which includes a 3D sketch of the center line for your route path. Please watch my demonstration video to learn how SOLIDWORKS Routing software can benefit you and your team!

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SOLIDWORKS Electrical 3D is the tool Mechanical Designers have been looking for

The Routing Component Wizard is your complete solution to prepare any SOLIDWORKS component to

Do you use SOLIDWORKS 3D CAD to create the world that has yet to be? For those of you that answered yes, please keep up the fantastic work! How do you handle electrical, pneumatic, and hydraulic connections in your 3D designs? Getting power to and from mechanical components is a critical design decision, and all too often is a task left to the manufacturing department. At minimum this limits the optimization of a design, but it can easily lead to a lack of standardization, production delays, and unnecessary costs from wasted material. No electrical design department? No problem! SOLIDWORKS Electrical 3D is the solution designed for mechanical designers to be able to easily specify all of their connection information. SOLIDWORKS Electrical makes it easy to quickly draw high-level diagrams of system interconnects. Cable information, such as colour, diameter, and bend radius, can then be applied directly to these schematics, allowing you to…

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Mechanical Engineering Meets SOLIDWORKS Electrical Episode 4 – Electrical Routing

Fully routed designs can improve communication and visualization of the project with stakeholders, allowing them to more confidently give it a green light.

Welcome back once again, loyal readers! This blog marks the culmination of my project to design an exciting new home theater system. If only the improved system could also improve the Canucks quality of play… In our previous adventures we explored setting up 2D components, combining those components into an intelligent 2D drawing, and adding electrical intelligence to our 3D models. Today we will use SOLIDWORKS Electrical Routing to bring it all together by assembling a 3D digital replica of my system, complete with accurate wiring/cabling. SOLIDWORKS Routing – It’s (Mostly) Not Magic SOLIDWORKS Routing is the primary reason we taught our components electrical intelligence. It is the tool that interprets the detailed wiring information from our 2D drawings and outputs optimized 3D wire/cable/harness routes. If given no other options or parameters, routing will automatically draw a point to point path between connected components. While this may be appropriate in…

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