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Using Artec 3D Scanners for reverse engineering naval ship components

In this case study learn how Artec scanners and software provide the perfect solution for reverse engineering and quality control.

Koninklijke Marine is a Dutch company responsible for the maintenance of all naval vessels and submarines of the Dutch Royal Navy, as well as M-class frigates of the Belgian Navy. The company also creates new parts for its ships and makes modifications of everything from the hull to weapon systems and engines, using both Artec Eva and Artec Space Spider 3D scanners for the best results.

One example of this is when an impeller of an LCVP (Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel) needed to be repaired. This boat goes up onto the shore when dropping off marines, and when it needs to reverse back into the water, the LCVP moves backward and the impeller sucks in sand and rocks beside the water. These rocks hit against the impeller and caused small pieces of it to break off.

The team 3D scanned the impeller and by using the resulting STL file they programmed their robotic welding system to perform accurate welding only on those areas where material needed to be added.

3D Model of the Impeller

3D model of the Impeller

3D scanning is also used for reverse engineering seats on FRISC-type high-speed boats, which can make up to 80 km/h and are used for intercepting purposes.Because of the high impact on the waves, the seats can crack and need repairing. In a recent project, Marinebedrijf Koninklijke Marine scanned one of the seats with Artec Eva and used the 3D information to create a reverse engineered mold, from which the seats are repaired.

“After collecting data, we are using all the tools available in Artec Studio to get a perfect model,” says Ben Jansen.

“If we need to do modifications where Artec Studio does not have the necessary tools, such as adding material to the 3D model, we export the file to other software, where we can make the required changes.”

After post-processing, the model is usually exported to Spaceclaim, a CAD package for reverse engineering, and a 3D file for 3D printing, milling or 3D welding is created. If necessary, 2D and 3D drawings are made for tool shops within the Royal Navy.

Featured Technology

Artec Eva 3D Scanner

Artec Eva 3D scanner is the ideal choice for those that need to receive a quick, textured and accurate scan. Eva doesn't require markers or calibration. It captures objects quickly in high resolution and vibrant colour, which allows for almost unlimited applications.

Based on safe-to-use structured light scanning technology, the Artec Eva is an excellent all round solution for capturing objects of almost any kind, including objects with black and shiny surfaces.

Artec Eva’s ease of use, speed and precision has made it an essential product for a wide range of industries. From rapid prototyping to quality control, CGI to heritage preservation, the automotive industry to forensics, medicine and prosthetics to aerospace, the device is used to customize, innovate and streamline countless forward-thinking industries.

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“In all of this the role of 3D scanning is growing rapidly. We noticed that when you have a perfect tool like this, also other people suddenly see the impact and how easy it is to make a matching scan of an object. Then they want to use the scanner as well.”

— Ben Jansen, Marinebedrijf Koninklijke Marine

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